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USCG AUX Diversity

     The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, Flotilla 5-1 for District 11 North’s “Diversity and Inclusion Calendar” was developed as an education and training tool to enhance mutual understanding and respect among the various religious, ethnic and cultural groups. This calendar is about honoring our differences and increasing awareness of the numerous important national and international observances and celebrations that may be commemorated in the United States. 

Acknowledging and respecting these events promotes greater knowledge of multiculturalism and diversity and is a foundation to inclusion.

Realizing diversity requires the creation of an inclusive work environment that respects and values the differences and similarities that each service member and employee brings to the Coast Guard Auxiliary.

The Coast Guard Auxiliary is defined by its history, culture, missions and traditions. This includes our people, who bring a wide range of diverse backgrounds and experiences that enrich our ability to perform our missions.


People are the strength of our service and diversity and inclusion is vital to our mission readiness and excellence.

Our mission is to build a positive environment for all personnel and nurture a climate of respect for people of all backgrounds and cultures. To this end, we will position the Coast Guard Auxiliary as a nationally recognized leader in diversity and inclusion management.

 

2018 Flotilla 5-1 Diversity Calendar 


   
 

July

July 1: Canada Day or Fête du Canada is a Canadian holiday that celebrates the 1867 enactment of the Constitution Act, which established the three former British colonies of Canada, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick, as a united nation called Canada.

July 4th: Independence Day (also known as the Fourth of July), a United States holiday that celebrates the adoption of the Declaration of Independence in 1776. The original American colonies declared independence from Britain and established themselves as a new nation known as the United States of America.

July 9: The Martyrdom of the Bab, Baha’is observe the anniversary of the Bab’s execution in Tabriz, Iran, in 1850.

July 11: World Population Day, an observance established in 1989 by the Governing Council of the United Nations Development Program. The annual event is designed to raise awareness of global population issues.

July 14th: Bastille Day, a French holiday that commemorates the Storming of the Bastille, a fortress-prison in Paris which held political prisoners who had displeased the French nobility. The Storming of the Bastille, which took place in 1789, was regarded as a turning point of the French Revolution. 

July 18: Nelson Mandela International Day, launched in recognition of Nelson Mandela’s birthday on July 18, 2009 via unanimous decision of the UN General Assembly. It was inspired by a call Nelson Mandela made a year earlier, for the next generation to take on the burden of leadership in addressing the world’s social injustices when he said “It is in your hands now”. It is more than a celebration of “Madiba’s” life and legacy. It is a global movement to honor his life’s work and act to change the world for the better.

July 21-22: Tisha B'Av, a fast in commemoration of the destruction of two very holy and sacred temples of Judaism destroyed by the Babylonians (in 586 B.C.E) and Romans (in 70 E.C). At the of Tisha B’Av, after very select passages from the Torah are read and understood, netilat yadayim, or the washing of the hands, is performed.

July 23: The birthday of Haile Selassie I, the former Emperor of Ethiopia, who the Rastafarians consider to be their Savior.

July 24: Pioneer Day, observed by the Mormons to commemorate the arrival in 1847 of the first Latter Day Saints pioneer in Salt Lake Valley.

July 26: Disability Independence Day, celebrating the anniversary of the 1990 signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

July 28: Asalha Puja Day or Dharma Day is a celebration of Buddha’s first teachings.

July 30: International Day of Friendship, proclaimed in 2011 by the UN General Assembly with the idea that friendship between peoples, countries, cultures and individuals can inspire peace efforts and build bridges between communities.

August

August 6: Transfiguration, a holiday recognized by Orthodox Christians to celebrate when Jesus communed with Moses and Elijah on Mount Tabor. To celebrate, adherents have a feast.

August 17: Marcus Garvey Day, which celebrates the birthday of the Jamaican politician and activist who is revered by Rastafarians. Garvey is credited with starting the Back to Africa movement, which encouraged those of African descent to return to the land of their ancestors during and after slavery in North America.

August 21-25: Eid Al-Adha an Islamic festival to commemorate the willingness of Ibrahim (also known as Abraham) to follow Allah's (God's) command to sacrifice his son Ishmael. Muslims around the world observe this event.

August 23: International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and the anniversary of the uprising in Santo Domingo (today Haiti and the Dominican Republic) that initiated the abolition of slavery in the Caribbean.

August 25: Hungry Ghost Festival, a Chinese holiday where street, market, and temple ceremonies take place to honor dead ancestors and appease other spirits.

August 25: Raksha Bandhan, a Hindu holiday commemorating the loving kinship between a brother and a sister. Raksha means protection in Hindi, and symbolizes the longing a sister has to be protected by her brother. During the celebration, a sister ties a string around her brother’s (or brother-figure’s) wrist, and asks him to protect her. The brother usually gives the sister a gift and agrees to protect her for life.

August 26: Women’s Equality Day, which commemorates the August 26, 1920 certification of the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution that gave women the right to vote. Congresswoman Bella Abzug first introduced a proclamation for Women’s Equality Day in 1971. Since that time, every president has published a proclamation recognizing August 26 as Women’s Equality Day.

September

From September 15 to October 15 is Hispanic Heritage Month, which corresponds with the Mexican Independence Day, September 16, and recognizes the 1810 revolution that ended their Spanish dictatorship.

September 2: Krishna Janmashtami, a Hindu celebration of Lord Vishnu’s most powerful human incarnations, Krishna, the god of love and compassion. Celebrations include praying and fasting.

September 3: Labor Day in the United States. Labor Day honors the contribution that laborers have made to the country and is observed on the first Monday of September.

September 6 (Sunrise): Paryushana Parva, a Jain festival lasting about 8-10 days, and is observed through meditation and fasting. Its main focus is spiritual upliftment, pursuit of salvation and gaining a deeper understanding of the religion.

September 9-11: Rosh-Hashanah, the Jewish New Year celebration, marking the creation of the world.

September 11: The Ethiopian New Year. Rastafarians celebrate the New Year on this date and believe that Ethiopia is their spiritual home.

September 12: Celebration of Ganesha, a Hindu holiday lasting around 10 days, where the elephant-headed Hindu God is praised and given offerings.

September 15 – October 15: Hispanic Heritage Month. This month corresponds with Mexican Independence Day,which is celebrated on September 16, and recognizes the revolution in 1810 that ended Spanish dictatorship.

September 18-19: Yom Kippur, the holiest day on the Jewish calendar, a day of atonement marked by fasting and ceremonial repentance.

September 20-21: Ashura, an Islamic holiday commemorating the day Noah left the ark and the day Allah saved Moses from the Egyptians.

September 23-30: Sukkot, a seven day Jewish festival giving thanks for the fall harvest.

September 28: Teacher’s Day in Taiwan. This day is used to honor teachers’ contributions to their students and to society in general. People often express their gratitude to their teachers by paying them a visit or sending them a card. This date was chosen to commemorate the birth of Confucius, the model master educator in ancient China.

September 30-October 2: Shemini Atzeret, a Jewish holiday also known as “The Eighth (Day) of Assembly” takes place the day after the Sukkot festival, where gratitude for the fall harvest is deeply internalized.

by Don Maiden
SO - Diversity
Division 5