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Diversity

  The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, Division 5 for District 11 North’s “Diversity and Inclusion Calendar” was developed as an education and training tool to enhance mutual understanding and respect among the various religious, ethnic and cultural groups. This calendar is about honoring our differences and increasing awareness of the numerous important national and international observances and celebrations that may be commemorated in the United States.

Acknowledging and respecting these events promotes greater knowledge of multiculturalism and diversity, and is a foundation to inclusion.

Realizing diversity requires the creation of an inclusive work environment that respects and values the differences and similarities that each service member and employee brings to the Coast Guard Auxiliary.

The Coast Guard Auxiliary is defined by its history, culture, missions and traditions. This includes our people, who bring a wide range of diverse backgrounds and experiences that enrich our ability to perform our missions. People are the strength of our service and diversity and inclusion is vital to our mission readiness and excellence.

Our mission is to build a positive environment for all personnel and nurture a climate of respect for people of all backgrounds and cultures. To this end, we will position the Coast Guard Auxiliary as a nationally recognized leader in diversity and inclusion management.

2018 Diversity Calendar 

                                                                                

May 

May is Asian-American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month in the United States. The month of May was chosen to commemorate the immigration of the first Japanese to the United States on May 7, 1843, and to mark the anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental railroad on May 10, 1869. The majority of the workers who laid the tracks on the project were Chinese immigrants.

May is also Older Americans Month, established in 1963 to honor the legacies and contributions of older Americans and to support them as they enter their next stage of life.

In addition, May is Jewish American Heritage Month, which recognizes the diverse contributions of the Jewish people to American culture.

May 1: Lailat al Bara’a, also known as Barat, or Night of Forgiveness, an Islamic holiday during which practitioners of the faith seek forgiveness for sins.

May 5: Cinco de Mayo, a Mexican holiday commemorating the Mexican army’s 1862 victory over France at the Battle of Puebla during the Franco-Mexican War (1861-1867). This day celebrates Mexican culture and heritage, including parades and mariachi music performances.

May 15 (sunset)-June 15: Ramadan, an Islamic holiday marked by fasting, praise, prayer and devotion to Islam.

May 17: International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia, a global celebration of sexual-orientation and gender diversities.

May 20: Pentecost, the celebration of the giving of the 10 Commandments by God at Mount Sinai.

May 21: World Day for Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development, a day set aside by the United Nations as an opportunity to deepen our understanding of the values of cultural diversity and to learn to live together better.

May 28: Memorial Day in the United States, a federal holiday established to honor military veterans who died in wars fought by American forces.

May 29: Buddha Day (Vesak or Visakha Puja), a Buddhist festival that marks Gautama Buddha's birth, enlightenment and death. It falls on the day of the full moon in May and it is a gazetted holiday in India.

June
June is Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month, established to recognize the impact that gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender individuals have had on the world. LGBT groups celebrate this special time with pride parades, picnics, parties, memorials for those lost to hate crimes and HIV/AIDS, and other group gatherings. The last Sunday in June is Gay Pride Day.

June 10: Lailat-al-Qadir, the holiest night of the year for Muslims traditionally celebrated on the 27th day of Ramadan. It is known as the “Night of Power,” and commemorates the night that the Quran was first revealed to the Prophet Muhammad.

June 14: Flag Day in the United States, observed to celebrate the history and symbolism of the American flag.

June 15: Eid-al-Fitr, the first day of the Islamic month of Shawwal, marking the end of Ramadan. Many Muslims attend communal prayers, listen to a khutba (sermon) and give zakat al-fitr (charity in the form of food) during Eid al-Fitr.

June 15: Native American Citizenship Day, commemorating the day in 1924 when the United States Congress passed legislation recognizing the citizenship of Native Americans.

June 16: the Martyrdom of Guru Arjan Dev, observed by members of the Sikh faith. Guru Arjan Dev was the fifth Sikh guru and the first Sikh martyr.

June 19: Juneteenth, also known as Freedom Day or Emancipation Day. It is observed as a public holiday in 14 U.S. states. This celebration honors the day in 1865 when slaves in Texas and Louisiana finally heard they were free, two months after the end of the Civil War. June 19, therefore, became the day of emancipation for thousands of Black Americans.

June 24: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Pride Day in the United States. It celebrates the Stonewall Riots on June 28, 1969.
 
Don Maiden
SO - Diversity
Division 5