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Flotilla 39-10 Member Training

Training & Education Opportunities Preview:

Although the Auxiliary offers regularly-scheduled training classes, these form only a part of the courses available to you. Did you know that you can take courses and exams  through the Coast Guard Learning Portal, the Coast Guard Institute, FEMA and others?

 

To learn more:

For the USCG Auxiliary National training site, log on to www.cgaux.org/training or log on to http://pdept.cgaux.org/learningPortal.htm.

 

For Division 39 training information, please log on to www.cgaux9wr.com/members/mt/member_training_classes.htm

 

For personal assistance, please contact your FSO-MT at brentbarkerchicago@yahoo.com Better yet – Come join us at the next flotilla meeting on November 10. 

 

How You Can Earn the AUX-OP Qualification:

AUX-OP candidates must complete 7 course credits in three areas: core courses (seamanship, weather, and communication), leadership, and electives. To learn more, click on the attached link:

http://cgaux.org/members/auxop_2011_info.php

 

 

Training Preview: Communications

The February 9 training session will focus on 4 elements of communications: the phonetic alphabet & pronunciation of numerals; the use of pro words and phrases; speaking & message standards; and a brief introduction to the Watchstander Program.

 

The following information is merely an introduction for those who are interested in developing their skills for the Watchstander & Boat Crew programs, etc. (Source: USCG AUX-COMM Manual, COMDTPUB P16794.32B.) For more details, please consult the AUX-COMM manual.

 

The Phonetic Alphabet:

ALPHA 
BRAVO
CHARLIE
DELTA
FOXTROT
GOLF 
HOTEL
INDIA
JULIET
KILO
LIMA
MIKE
NOVEMBER
OSCAR
PAPA
QUEBEC
ROMEO
SIERRA
TANGO
UNIFORM
VICTOR
WHISKEY
X-RAY
YANKEE 
ZULU 
 
Suggestion: Cut out this card and carry it with you. Regular practice will help you develop a high level of proficiency. A tip: Try spelling out signs phonetically during your daily commute.

 

Pronouncing Numerals:

To avoid confusion, numerals are pronounced as follows:

0 = Zero      1 = Wun    2 = Too   3 = Thuh-ree                                                                      4 = Fo-wer   5 = Fi-iv    6 = Six    7 = Seven    8 = Ate      9 = Niner

Additional Tips:

The numeral zero must be pronounced “zero,”never as the letter O. Decimal points are pronounced, “day-see-mal.”

Numbers are pronounced using individual digits.

 

A Few Important Pro Words & Phrases:

Over: Transmission over. (Reply expected.)

Out: End of transmission. (No reply required.)

Roger: I have received your last transmission satisfactorily.

Wilco: I have received & understand your message, and I will comply.

That is correct: Correct

Wrong: Wrong

Mayday: A  distress signal – followed by a distress message.

Pan Pan: An urgency signal – followed by a safety message.

Security: A safety signal – followed by a message re: the safety of navigation or a meteorological warning.

 

A Few Important Speaking & Message Standards:

Do listen before transmitting. Don’t interrupt. Do use only authorized pro words. Don’t transmit hoax distress signals. Do speak clearly, slowly, & distinctly at a copying speed. Don’t slur words, use slang or profanity. Do keep the microphone 2 inches from your lips and speak in a moderately strong voice. Don’t violate radio silence. Do consider taking the AUX-COMM course!